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Enteral feeding tubes

Here are the different types of feeding tube that may be used:

  • Nasogastric tube (NG-tube)

    An NG-tube is a small thin tube inserted through a persons nose, throat and down into the stomach. The tube is usually attached with tape to the side of the face to hold it in place.

    NG-tube feeding is usually only a temporary solution. It can give life saving nutrition to a person who is struggling to eat orally themselves.

    Nasojejunal tube or NJ-tube:

    This is similar to the NG-tube except it passes through the stomach into one of the upper parts of the intestine called the jejunum.

  • Gastrostomy Feeding (G-tube or peg tube)

    G-Tubes are surgically inserted and removed with an endoscope. These are a more permanent option for patients who will require longer term tube feeding. A small incision is made in the abdomen through to the stomach. The G-tube has a disc connected which sits on the inside of the stomach wall, to hold the G-Tube in place, and stop it being pulled out. G-tubes should be turned regularly and the length measured to ensure it is still correctly in place.

  • Gastrostomy-Jejunostomy or GJ-tube (Transgastric-Jejunal or TJ tube):

    This is again like the G-tube and is surgically inserted, and like the NJ-tube it is guided though the stomach down into the jejunum.

  • Balloon device (tube or button)

    Buttons are used again for more long term in patients, and tend to be more widely acceptable due to there low profile design.

    The button device often replaces the long peg type tube after healing has taken place and a new tube is required. They are held in place with a small amount of water connected to the button which sits inside the stomach wall. The most common types of buttons are the mikey made by kimberley clarke ,or the amt mini made by applied technology. Both are very similar in design and more often that not its down to district or doctors preference. They can be changed by the patient or there carer as there is no anesthetic required. it is important to check regularly the water level in side the balloon.

  • Jejunostomy or J-tube:

    This is the same as both the NJ-tube and the GJ-tube the make a surgical incision in the abdomen wall, the difference is they bypass the stomach and go directly into the jejunum.

  • Total parenteral nutrition (TPN):

    is the practice of feeding a person intravenously, it passes the usual process of eating and digestion.

    This is a link to our forum support section were parents have added pictures of the differant types of feeding tubes.

  • Written by Tracey (Chairman) and
    Di (Chairman)

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